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Best approach for multi layered cloth 6 months 3 weeks ago #933

  • mikeCFC
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Hi all, for situations where you might have lots of layers of cloth, is there any benefit (in terms of speed, accuracy etc) one way or the other to having lots of individual cloth nodes or to combine the meshes into one mesh and using one cloth node (relying on self collision)?
Think 200 pages of a book, a pile of leaves, the crystal maze dome gold and silver tickets settling etc
Thanks,
Mike.
 

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Best approach for multi layered cloth 6 months 3 weeks ago #934

  • Sebastian
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Hi Mike,

Thanks for your question.

It really depends on your use case.
When you have multiple Cloths, there are two advantages:
  1. You can set properties/cloth materials per cloth, i.e. you do not need to use paintmaps to achieve different material behavior. This is useful for panelled garments like a suit jacket where you have cotton pieces and leather pieces, etc.
  2. Some stages of the solver process multiple Cloths in parallel, i.e. in general you get noticeably faster simulation results.
1 is irrelevant if all parts have the same Cloth properties.
2 is only useful if each Cloth has got a decent number of triangles (I do not know exactly where the cut-off is; maybe a few hundred to a 1000), as otherwise the task of spawning, managing and merging parallel threads to process each individual cloth takes more time to manage than just running the whole thing in a single cloth.

The other aspect is the overhead coming from Maya.
Let's say you have a pile of 100,000 leaves and you wanted to simulate each leaf as a separate cloth. It might be painful to manage and potentially quite slow from a Maya side of things to have 100,000 Cloth nodes in the scene. You probably have a lot of experience yourself, but I found Maya to struggle a bit more than Houdini with large graphs.

There are clear cases where we use multiple Cloths:
  1. Character outfit, i.e. trousers and top as separate cloths
  2. High resolution panelled garments where we would use the garment processor. If each panel has 1000 or more triangles, you can definitely see a difference in speed.
I think cases like a pile of leaves or 200 pages of a book might be better to simulate as a single Cloth, but without actually having the scenes and testing either way, it's impossible to say for sure.

I hope this is helpful.

Cheers,
Sebastian
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Best approach for multi layered cloth 6 months 3 weeks ago #935

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also just to add that cloths with different thickness need to be seperate as thickness is one property that is not paintable.

Txs.
 

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Best approach for multi layered cloth 6 months 2 weeks ago #939

  • mikeCFC
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Thanks, this is really useful information.
I think for my case usage I don't not need indiviudal control over cloth properties and the resolution of each indiviual cloth shell is fairly low. So I will merge them into a single cloth piece.

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